• We can help! 218.207.9611

American Cockroach

12-11-2012

The American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), also known as the waterbug,[1] or misidentified as the palmetto bug (see Florida woods cockroach for the differences), is the largest species of common cockroach, and often considered a pest. None of the Periplaneta species are endemic to the Americas; despite the name, P. americana was introduced to the United States from Africa as early as 1625.[2] They are now common in tropical climates because human activity has extended the insect's range of habitation, and global shipping has transported the insects to world ports including the Southern United States, Canary Islands, southern Spain, Greece, Taiwan, India and South Africa.

Bees/Yellowjackets

12-11-2012

Yellow Jacket

 
Yellow jacket
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Order:Hymenoptera
Family:Vespidae
Subfamily:Vespinae
Genus:Vespula or Dolichovespula

Yellow jacket is the common name in North America for predatory wasps of the genera Vespula and Dolichovespula. Members of these genera are known simply as "wasps" in other English-speaking countries. Most of these are black and yellow; some are black and white (such as the bald-faced hornet, Dolichovespula maculata), while others may have the abdomen background color red instead of black. They can be identified by their distinctive markings, small size (similar to a honey bee), their occurrence only in colonies, and a characteristic, rapid, side to side flight pattern prior to landing. All females are capable of stinging. Despite having drawn the loathing of humans, yellow jackets are in fact important predators of pest insects.[1>

 


Bedbugs

07-17-2011

Bed bugs are parasitic insects of the cimicid family that feed exclusively on blood. The term most commonly refers to members of the genus Cimex of which Cimex lectularius, the common bed bug, is the best known as it prefers to feed on human blood although other Cimex species are specialized to other animals, e.g., bat bugs, C. pipistrelli (Europe), C. pilosellus (western US), and C. adjunctus (entire eastern US).[2]

The name of the "bed bug" is derived from the preferred habitat of Cimex lectularius: warm houses and especially nearby or inside of beds and bedding or other sleep areas. Bed bugs are mainly active at night, but are not exclusively nocturnal. They usually feed on their hosts without being noticed.[3][4][4][5]

A number of adverse health effects may result from bed bug bites, including skin rashes, psychological effects, and allergic symptoms. Diagnosis involves both finding bed bugs and the occurrence of compatible symptoms.

Bed bugs have been known as human parasites for thousands of years.[6] At a point in the early 1940s, they were mostly eradicated in the developed world, but have recently increased in prevalence since 1995.[7][8] Because infestation of human habitats has been on the increase, bed bug bites and related conditions

American Cockroach (2)
12-11-2012

Bees/Yellowjackets (1)
12-11-2012

Bedbugs (3)
07-17-2011

See All →

Contact us

Contact Us
First step to no pests...